Pet Diabetes Awareness Month

Free Screening

This event will happen every Tuesday and Wednesday morning for the month of October. Dogs and cats should be fasted overnight before testing – that’s why we are doing it in the morning. The testing should take no more than 10 minutes and a small blood sample is all that is needed. If you know of anyone who could benefit from this, please share. Diabetes can be controlled best if treated early! Please call for an appointment.

Diabetes in Cats

What is feline diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus, the clinical name for “sugar diabetes,” is a condition that affects the concentration of glucose, a type of sugar, in your cat’s blood. Diabetes results from a shortage of insulin or when the body has trouble using the insulin it has made properly.

Insulin affects the way your cat’s body uses food. When your cat eats, food is broken down into very small components that the body can use. One component, carbohydrate, is converted into several types of sugars, including glucose. Glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood. Once in the bloodstream, glucose travels to cells where it can be absorbed and used as a source of energy—if insulin is present. Without enough insulin, glucose can’t enter cells and builds up in the bloodstream. So your cat may act hungry all the time and eat constantly, but still be malnourished because its cells can’t absorb glucose.

Diabetes occurs in cats when their cells no longer respond normally to the amounts of insulin produced by the pancreas. Cats with diabetes usually need to have insulin injections, at least initially, as well as an appropriate diet. Your veterinarian will recommend the most appropriate treatment for your cat’s diabetes.

For more information go to:  http://www.petdiabetesmonth.com/cat_what_is.asp

Diabetes in Dogs

What is canine diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus, the clinical name for “sugar diabetes,” is a condition that affects the concentration of glucose, or sugar, in your dog’s blood. Diabetes results when the dog’s body makes too little insulin or doesn’t process insulin properly.

Insulin affects how your dog’s body uses food. When your dog eats, food is broken down into very small components its body can use. One component, carbohydrate, is converted into several types of simple sugars, including glucose. Glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, where it travels to cells throughout the body. Inside cells, insulin helps turn glucose into fuel. If there’s too little insulin available, glucose can’t enter cells and can build up to a high concentration in the bloodstream. As a result, a diabetic dog may want to eat constantly, but will appear malnourished because its cells can’t absorb glucose.

For more inflormation go to: http://www.petdiabetesmonth.com/dog_what_is.asp